Boston University’s new CILSE

Boston University is creating a new Center for Integrated Life Science and Engineering (CILSE) for interdisciplinary research which will bring together outstanding scientists and engineers from across the University to work collaboratively in the areas of neuroscience and biological design.

CILSE will comprise 170,000 square feet. Its core resources will include a shared equipment facility for Cognitive Neuroimaging. Three new research Centers will be launched including the Center for Systems Neuroscience and the Center for Sensory Communication and Neural Technology.

 Boston University Center for Integrated Life Science and Engineering (CILSE)

Web Information

Website:  bu.edu/neuro
BRAIN Grant – “High-Density Recording and Stimulating Microelectrodes”

Contact Information

Email: shinn@bu.edu
Phone: (617) 353-5764

Organization

Director: Barbara Shinn-Cunningham


Background

The BRAIN Initiative Fact Sheet 9/30/14

Boston University is announcing alignment of new neuroscience centers with the goals of the BRAIN Initiative:

In 2014, Boston University announced a commitment of $140 million for the creation of the Center for Integrated Life Science and Engineering (CILSE), a new and unique facility for interdisciplinary research which will bring together outstanding scientists and engineers from across the University to work collaboratively in the areas of neuroscience and biological design. CILSE will comprise 170,000 square feet and support approximately 20 faculty and some 400 students and staff. Its core resources will include a shared equipment facility for Cognitive Neuroimaging. Three new research Centers will be launched including the Center for Systems Neuroscience and the Center for Sensory Communication and Neural Technology. The University has committed an additional $4 million over 5 years to the aunching of these Neuroscience Centers and they will focus on addressing the goals of the BRAIN Initiative.

BU Brain Researchers among Those Invited to White House

BU Today by Sarah Rimer 10/1/14

BU’s Gloria Waters, Michael Hasselmo, and Timothy Gardner were among the academic, industry, and philanthropic leaders invited to the White House yesterday for a conference announcing stepped-up efforts to advance the president’s ambitious BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Neurotechnologies) Initiative. Waters, University vice president and associate provost for research, Hasselmo, a College of Arts & Sciences professor of psychological and brain sciences and director of BU’s new Center for Systems Neuroscience, and Gardner, a CAS assistant professor of biology and a College of Engineering assistant professor of biomedical engineering, were invited to the conference in recognition of BU’s commitment to the initiative.

Science gets a front door on Comm Ave

BU Research News
By Barbara Moran and Sara Rimer

Center for Integrated Life Sciences & Engineering will bridge disciplines across sciences

For decades, some of the most exciting research at Boston University has been unfolding in a row of buildings hidden on Cummington Mall, designed originally for making carriages instead of studying the life sciences.
Now University President Robert A. Brown is giving science a more prominent address on the University’s main thoroughfare. In late May or early summer of 2015, at what is now a parking lot at 610 Commonwealth Avenue, BU will break ground for its new Center for Integrated Life Sciences & Engineering (CILSE), a $140 million, state-of-the-art, nine-story research facility that will bring together life scientists, engineers, and physicians from the Medical and Charles River Campuses. The building will be dedicated to systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroimaging, and biological design. With shared, flexible lab spaces, meeting rooms and other common areas, it is being designed to encourage the kind of collaborative, interdisciplinary research that will be the hallmark of 21st-century science“Today, many of the outstanding challenges in science lie at the boundaries between traditional disciplines or the unchartered spaces between them,” says President Brown. These unchartered spaces will be explored at CILSE, a place, says Brown, that will foster “major interdisciplinary research efforts led by faculty from many departments and schools, but with common interests.”
It will contain lab space for approximately 160 researchers, postdoctoral students, and staff, 270 graduate students, and additional space for future faculty.
CILSE will be built adjacent to historic Morse Auditorium and is expected to be finished in late 2016 or early 2017. It will contain lab space for approximately 160 researchers, postdoctoral students, and staff, 270 graduate students, and additional space for future faculty. The architects are from Payette, a Boston firm that has built prize-winning science buildings for major research universities and other institutions around the world.

The 170,000-square-foot building will house the Center for Systems Neuroscience, the Biological Design Center, the Center for Sensory Communication and Neuroengineering Technology, and a Cognitive Neuroimaging Center with a 3 Tesla fMRI—a fundamental tool for studying the brain’s trillions of neural connections and how they relate to human behavior. The imaging technology will serve faculty from schools and departments across BU’s sprawling neuroscience community—and from other universities around Boston—who study everything from how we learn, think, and remember, to traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer’s disease.

“In the life sciences and engineering, we have world-class faculty. We need facilities to match,” says Gloria Waters, vice president and associate provost for research. “We decided to invest in better lab space that would bring faculty together in a very unique and interdisciplinary environment.”

College of Engineering (ENG) Professor of Biomedical Engineering Barbara Shinn-Cunningham.

College of Engineering (ENG) Professor of Biomedical Engineering Barbara Shinn-Cunningham.

The new Center for Sensory Communication and Neuroengineering Technology will be directed by Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, a College of Engineering (ENG) professor of biomedical engineering, and will bring together neuroscientists and sensory physiologists who study hearing, speech, and language, as well as mathematicians who investigate neural coding. The center will connect scientists in these areas to enhance technological innovation, and develop technologies such as neural prosthetics and brain-computer interfaces.

 

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